FMA

November 19, 2006 at 9:38 am Leave a comment

I managed to make it to last week’s LOSUG meeting about FMA, which I mentioned earlier.

The turn-out wasn’t so big as before, but hey, more free beer and nibbles for everyone else!

Currently it seems that FMA isn’t entirely integrated with SMF, so I was half-right and half-wrong before. The real disappointment for me is that it barely supports AMD boxes and it has zero support for Intel boxes. That mostly seems to be due to deficiencies in AMD and Intel.

But on recent SPARC boxes – wow, it can do some incredibly neat things! Gavin Maltby, the presenter, gave a demo of injecting a particular kind of memory fault. He then used (I think) fmdump to see exactly what the system thought had gone wrong. And the system had accurately identified the problem and narrowed it down to happening with one particular CPU, and offlined it for safety. That’s the self-healing bit, I guess.

The “predictive” bit is that they can monitor bits of hardware over time and by watching the voltage load (say) for a given part someone can tell that part’s going to fail in a week’s time (or whatever). Very cool.

Some of this code isn’t in OpenSolaris. Most of it is, but apparently Sun is cautious about revealing fixes for processor errata that haven’t themselves been made public. Allegedly these fixes are in OpenSolaris, but obfuscated in some way.

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Entry filed under: OpenSolaris.

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